How To Make Your Writing More Exciting

September 20, 2017

The skill of hypnotizing the reader will never go out of fashion and will probably remain one of the hottest topics for famous writers such as George Martin, famous copywriters such as John Sugarman and famous writing services such as Scooby Do My Essay.

In fact, there are so many aspiring writers that new writing tricks will constantly be invented, new strategies will appear, and new mistakes will be made to the great annoyance of readers.

If you are one of such aspiring writers, please accept our condolences – the trade is hard and there is always a feeling of being worse than every other writer (such doubts plague all talented writers).

As one of such writers, you are probably constantly searching for new tips and sources of inspiration. As a non-writer, you will still benefit from such tips to improve your writing. For both categories, we have described writing tips that could help your writing flow and stand out.

Hinting at the development of the plot (foreshadowing)

Is there something that can hold a reader’s attention better than hinting at what comes next? Since we are not talking about academic papers here, your writing will most likely have a plot. By disclosing minor details of what will happen, you will be able to draw your reader’s attention and maintain a firm grasp on it until the very end. Tolkien did it. Dreiser did it. There must be something good about this technique, don’t you think?

Using colloquial transitions

Imagine going down a water slide. It ends with a little twirl, which carefully but confidently sends you in a completely different slide to continue the journey. That’s what good transitions do. They send your mind in a different direction, giving you a little shake in the process. They can look like one-word or one-sentence paragraphs. Their goal is to signify that the topic is changing and to wake you up from the lull of the previous few paragraphs. Such transitions prevent readers from feeling lost in your train of thought and getting to sleep because of your peaceful narration (if it is indeed peaceful).

Breaking it up in shorter sentences and paragraphs. Then doing it again

Writing shorter sentences is a well-known technique of making your writing more readable. Take it up a notch by breaking the wall of text in short paragraphs and then mixing short sentences with long ones to achieve a “melody” in your writing. Your long sentences shouldn’t be over 20 words, while your short ones can be as short as one word. If you can make them even shorter after the first round of editing, do it. Give it a look a day later – does it flow?

Your goal should be to write as you speak, but without all the “erm’s” and other emphatic elements. In fact, writing in short clear sentences requires if not more, then a different kind of talent. And you should aim to develop this skill first – only to break it then, if need be.

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